Proverbs 27:16

Whosoever hideth her hideth the wind, and the ointment of his right hand, which bewrayeth itself.
– Proverbs 27:16

Verse 16 continues from the previous verse. The wording of the original is difficult and scholars have had varied opinions. The thrust of the saying is the uncontrollable nature of the contentious woman. Trying to restrain or correct her is like trying to grasp the wind, or shut it up, and like trying to hold oil in your hand. This saying confirms the place of the contentious woman in Proverbs’ gallery of fools (Proverbs 12:15-16; 15:2, 5; 17:10; 20:3; 22:15; 27:22).

 


 

 

Proverbs 27:15

A continual dropping in a very rainy day and a contentious woman are alike.
– Proverbs 27:15

Verses 15-16 form a saying about a contentious, or quarrelsome, wife. Here the contentious woman is compared to a constant drip on a rainy day. The word for very rainy means pouring rain, which increases the irritation from the drip. The drip is further described as continual, or continuous. The contentious woman is a certain type of fool in Proverbs, lacking wisdom and causing continual sorrow. Her presence and repeated quarrels keeps a man from peace and drives him to the wilderness or housetop as preferable living quarters (Proverbs 19:13; 21:9; 25:24).

 


 

 

Proverbs 27:14

He that blesseth his friend with a loud voice, rising early in the morning, it shall be a curse to him.
– Proverbs 27:14

Words should be few (Proverbs 10:19; 11:12-13), dispassionate (Proverbs 15:1; 17:27), true (Proverbs 16:13; 24:24-26), appropriate (Proverbs 25:11), and timely (Proverbs 15:23). A lack of discernment, such as speaking too loud and too early, can turn a blessing otherwise into a curse.

 


 

 

Proverbs 27:13

Take his garment that is surety for a stranger, and take a pledge of him for a strange woman.
– Proverbs 27:13

Wisdom consistently warns against rash pledges and sureties (Proverbs 6:1-4; 17:18; 20:16; 22:26-27). This saying essentially parallels the one in Proverbs 20:16. The inclusion here could be an example or a warning for the previous saying that a simple person doesn’t perceive risks and comes to suffer the consequences.

 


 

 

Proverbs 27:12

A prudent man foreseeth the evil, and hideth himself; but the simple pass on, and and are punished.
– Proverbs 27:12

This saying is the same as Proverbs 22:3, and captures a key teaching about wisdom in the book of Proverbs. The prudent man is contrasted with the simple. Their outcomes are different in that the prudent are hidden from calamity and the simple suffer a penalizing consequence. The word for prudent means shrewd and applies to the ability to make plans. The word for simple means naive, or insensible. The different outcomes are because the prudent looks ahead and perceives problems and the simple plunge forward thoughtlessly and carelessly.

 


 

 

Proverbs 27:11

My son, be wise, and make my heart glad, that I may answer him that reproacheth me.
– Proverbs 27:11

The father/teacher/sage rejoices when the children/students learn what is being taught (Proverbs 10:1; 15:20; 23:15-16, 24-25). The word for reproacheth gives the idea of taunting or criticism. The best answer is a wise son. Jesus referred to this principle when he said, “But wisdom is justified of her children” (Matthew 11:19).

 


 

 

Proverbs 27:10

Thine own friend, and thy father’s friend, forsake not; neither go into thy brother’s house in the day of thy calamity: for better is a neighbor that is near than a brother far off.
– Proverbs 27:10

Family connections are presented as the strongest bonds and form a standard for comparisons of the friendship of neighbors and friends (Proverbs 17:17; 18:24). Overall, this saying is about cultivating relationships. The image of a near neighbor suggests relationships with those who are close at hand spatially. Even if they are not blood relation, they are near and better than blood relation far away in times of calamity. Wisdom cultivates community.

 


 

 

Proverbs 27:9

Ointment and perfume rejoice the heart: so doth the sweetness of a man’s friend by hearty counsel.

– Proverbs 27:9

Pleasing aromas can refresh, cheer, and energize. The point of the saying is likening hearty counsel from a friend to ointment and perfume in the ability to rejoice the heart. This saying speaks to the power of good words. Various proverbs speak to the restorative and refreshing power of good words (Proverbs 12:25; 15:23, 30; 16:24; 17:22; 25:25).

 


 

 

Proverbs 27:8

As a bird that wandereth from her nest, so is a man that wandereth from his place.

– Proverbs 27:8

This saying is difficult and commentators vary widely on interpretation. The likeness between a bird leaving her nest and a man wandering, presumably, from home seems to be about vulnerability and leaving protection. We might make a connection of place with way of wisdom. In this sense, it is a fool that leaves the way of wisdom (Proverbs 17:24), which results in destruction (Proverbs 21:16).

 


 

 

« Previous PageNext Page »